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Greta Garbo Biography (1905-1990)


Greta Garbo, original name Greta Lovisa Gustafsson, (born September 18, 1905, Stockholm, Sweden—died April 15, 1990, New York, New York, U.S.), one of the most glamorous and popular motion-picture stars of the 1920s and ’30s, who is best known for her portrayals of strong-willed heroines, most of them as compellingly enigmatic as Garbo herself.

The daughter of an itinerant labourer, Greta Gustafsson was reared in poverty in a Stockholm slum. She was working as a department-store clerk when she met film director Erik Petschler, who gave her a small part in Luffar-Petter (1922; Peter the Tramp). From 1922 to 1924 she studied at the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm, and in 1924 she played a major role in Gösta Berlings Saga (“The Story of Gösta Berling”). The film’s director, Mauritz Stiller, gave her the name Garbo, and in 1925 he secured her a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) in Hollywood.

At first, MGM chief Louis B. Mayer was skeptical of Garbo’s talent, but he and all studio executives were impressed by the initial rushes of her first American film, The Torrent (1926). Garbo projected a luminous quality that was perfect for silent pictures, motivating Mayer to sign her to an exclusive contract and raise her salary even before she completed work on this film. Throughout the remainder of the decade, Garbo appeared in such popular romantic dramas as Flesh and the Devil (1927), Love (1927), A Woman of Affairs (1928), and The Kiss (1929). She often costarred with John Gilbert, with whom she was romantically involved offscreen. Garbo’s success during this stage of her career was based not only on her mysterious, ethereal screen persona but also on public interest in the Garbo-Gilbert affair.



Sound allowed for Garbo to become an even bigger star, although her popularity was always greater in Europe than in the United States. “Garbo talks!” was MGM’s promotional tagline for Anna Christie (1930), Garbo’s first sound film. Her first spoken words on screen—“Give me a viskey”—revealed a husky, resonant voice that added to her allure and her somewhat androgynous persona that has appealed to both genders throughout the years. It was also one of two films she made in 1930—the other being Romance—for which Garbo received an Academy Award nomination. She poignantly portrayed an aging ballerina in the all-star classic Grand Hotel (1932), the film in which she first uttered her signature line, “I want to be alone.” Her stardom was such at this point that she was billed merely as “Garbo” for the film.

Wool – 5 Ways To Make Money From Home With Fleece


Owning wool producing animals is fun, but can you make cash from domestic with sheep, alpaca, or other fiber animals? Yes, you can. Turn your wool fiber into cash five exceptional ways.

#1. Sell your raw wool. With good marketing strategies, your clean, carded, and maybe even dyed fleece will start producing cash. Who could buy it? Felters and spinners. Make sure your fiber is in perfect circumstance and not using a vegetable matter. Build a good popularity for offering remarkable fleece and people crafters might be trustworthy return customers clammoring in your animals fiber.

#2. Offer hand-crafted merchandise out of your wool. Learn to spin and make strong point yarns to promote. Knitting with wool yarn and felting the undertaking is very popular today. You can capitalize on this trend together with your animal fleece. Sell your yarn and deliver away an smooth free handbag pattern with felting commands for knitters to attempt their first felting task with the yarn.

Lean to knit and crochet. You can make handmade sweaters, vests, hats, scarfs, etc. Find a niche marketplace and sell your home made items to those who would truly experience owning them.

Become versed in felting. Try wet felting and dry felting both. You can wet felt purses, vests, slippers, mittens, and more. Dry felting gives you the capability to make three dimensional sculptures and wallhangings.



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